JON SWEENEY, PETER DE GROOT, LINDA MACDONALD, SANDY SMITH,CHRISTIAN COCQUEMPOT, MARC KENIS, AND JERZY M. GUTOWSKI
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service

SERG Project #2002/01
Year of Project: 2002
Paper Published: 2004

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Environ.Entomol.33(4): 844-854 (2004)

ABSTRACT

Cortical and sapwood volatiles were collected in situ from red spruce, Picea rubens (Sarg.), trees infested with Tetropium fuscum (F.), to determine the relative concentrations and enantiomer ratios of monoterpenes emitted.This information was used to create a synthetic “spruce blend” lure that was tested in various trap designs for efȚcacy in capturing T. fuscum, and Tetropium castaneum L.in Țeld bioassays conducted on McNabs Island, Nova Scotia, in 2001 and 2002 and in Poland and Switzerland in 2002.Response of other cerambycid species was measured opportunistically. Cross-vane pan traps baited with spruce blend caught signiȚcantly more T. fuscum than unbaited traps or traps baited with racemic-pinene, ethanol, or both.The addition of an ethanol lure to spruce blendĐbaited traps signiȚcantly increased capture of T. fuscum and T. castaneum. There were no signiȚcant differences among trap designs in mean catch of either Tetropium species.Spruce blend was also signiȚcantly attractive to Monochamus urussovii (Fischer) and, when paired with an ethanol lure, was signiȚcantly attractive to Spondylis buprestoides L. Asemum striatum L.was signiȚcantly attracted to racemic-pinene but was not attracted to spruce blend or spruce blend plus ethanol.None of the lures tested were signiȚcantly attractive to Stictoleptura rubra L.or Alosterna tabacicolor (DeGeer).